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Vision eye institute coburg


Coburg Eye Clinic - Eye Surgery

At Vision Eye Institute Coburg, we have the latest ophthalmic equipment and technology and this, together with our highly experienced doctors, means patients can rest assured that they are receiving professional, high-quality eye care.

Patients are kept comfortable with 3 waiting areas featuring free WiFi, TVs, up-to-date magazines, crossword and word-search books and restrooms. We also have 7 consulting rooms, 2 treatment rooms, an angiogram room, and retinal and YAG lasers. Our doctors can access patients’ OCT and VFT test results directly from the consulting room computers.

Surgical procedures are performed at Panch Day Surgery in Preston, Camberwell Day Surgery and Footscray Day Surgery. We can usually perform intravitreal injections (IVI) as an outpatient procedure to minimise costs for our patients.

As part of our service, patients are seen by our highly trained clinical orthoptists before their consultation with the ophthalmologist. Orthoptists are university-trained technicians who play an important role in the assessment, diagnosis and management of patients with eye disorders. The orthoptist is able to answer many questions about your condition and treatment or surgical plan to help you make an informed decision.

We also have several staff members who speak other languages (Greek, Italian, Turkish, Mandarin, Chinese and Macedonian) and may be available for translation purposes. Please note, however, that we cannot guarantee the availability of a translator. Where possible, patients are asked to bring someone who can translate for them.

Vision Eye Institute Coburg ophthalmologists have significant experience and interest in treating a range of conditions that affect the eye. Some of the main services that our eye specialists provide are listed below.

Cataract surgery

Cataract surgery is one of the most common procedures performed in the world and can restore your vision and quality of life. Cataracts form when the normally transparent lens in your eye becomes cloudy. Surgery to remove and replace the lens with an artificial one is the only way to treat a cataract. With the development of new intraocular lenses, some patients may not require reading glasses after their cataract procedure. Our cataract surgeons are highly experienced and can help you choose the right lens for your vision and lifestyle needs.

Corneal conditions

Vision Eye Institute Coburg is one of the main eye clinics in Melbourne that performs corneal cross-linking for patients with keratoconus. This procedure may be recommended by your doctor to help stop the condition from progressing and your eye sight from deteriorating further. Corneal collagen-cross-linking is now available on the Medicare Benefits Scheme, meaning patients can access a rebate.

Our doctors also treat other corneal conditions such as corneal abrasions and ulcers, keratitis, Fuchs’ dystrophy, pterygium (Surfer’s Eye) and ocular herpes.

Retinal conditions

We treat the full range of retinal conditions, including macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal tears, macular holes and eye floaters.

Pupil-dilating drops are often used to allow a thorough examination of the retina, which is the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye. These drops make your vision blurry and increase sensitivity to glare and light. Please bring a pair of sunglasses with you to the consultation and be aware that you may need to wait until your vision has returned to normal before you can drive home. Alternatively, you may wish to make other travel arrangements.

Please be aware that some retinal conditions require urgent treatment, perhaps even on the day of your consultation.

Vision Eye Institute Coburg patients with macular conditions are able to access a support program called Smart Sight. Please ask your doctor or orthoptist for further information.

Glaucoma

Also known as the ‘sneak thief of sight’, glaucoma is often undetected until it has reached the advanced stages and there is significant and irreversible vision loss. Unfortunately, there is no cure for glaucoma. Our doctors have expertise in diagnosing and managing this chronic condition using medications, laser therapy, minimally invasive surgery (e.g. iStent) and trabeculectomy.

Laser eye surgery

Most people with short-sightedness, long-sightedness and astigmatism are eligible for some form of vision correction procedure. Our surgeons have expertise in laser eye surgery (LASIK, ASLA/PRK), refractive lens exchange and implantable lenses.

At your initial assessment, we will carefully examine your eyes to determine whether you are suitable for vision correction. At the same time, we can also recommend the procedure that is most appropriate for you. Like any surgery, there are benefits and risks and your surgeons will discuss these with you in detail.

The following services are available at our clinic:

  • Free, no obligation laser surgery assessments performed by our Clinical Optometrist, Kyra Stretton. Find out if you are eligible for laser eye surgery.
  • Pre-surgical consultations with one of our highly experienced laser eye surgeons or Clinical Optometrist Kyra Stretton. Have your full assessment before surgery, discuss the most suitable surgical option for you (LASIK or PRK) and get all your questions answered.
  • Post-operative care supported by Kyra Stretton, in conjunction with our laser doctors.

Laser eye surgery will be performed at our dedicated, state-of-the-art laser suite at our Melbourne (St Kilda Rd) clinic.

Payment plans

Vision Eye Institute patients can access a plan to suit their needs through one of the following options.*

  • LatitudePay for services up to $1,000 – Interest Free, ten weekly payments, no account fees, fast approval
  • LatitudePay+ for services up to $10,000 – Interest Free, flexible repayment period (6, 12, 18 or 24 months), low monthly account fee, fast approval

*Approved customers only. Full T&Cs apply. Payment plan provided by LatitudePay Australia Pty Ltd ABN 23 633 538 873. Before applying for any form of credit, always read the full terms and conditions.

Coburg Eye Clinic - Eye Surgery

At Vision Eye Institute Coburg, we have the latest ophthalmic equipment and technology and this, together with our highly experienced doctors, means patients can rest assured that they are receiving professional, high-quality eye care.

Patients are kept comfortable with 3 waiting areas featuring free WiFi, TVs, up-to-date magazines, crossword and word-search books and restrooms. We also have 7 consulting rooms, 2 treatment rooms, an angiogram room, and retinal and YAG lasers. Our doctors can access patients’ OCT and VFT test results directly from the consulting room computers.

Surgical procedures are performed at Panch Day Surgery in Preston, Camberwell Day Surgery and Footscray Day Surgery. We can usually perform intravitreal injections (IVI) as an outpatient procedure to minimise costs for our patients.

As part of our service, patients are seen by our highly trained clinical orthoptists before their consultation with the ophthalmologist. Orthoptists are university-trained technicians who play an important role in the assessment, diagnosis and management of patients with eye disorders. The orthoptist is able to answer many questions about your condition and treatment or surgical plan to help you make an informed decision.

We also have several staff members who speak other languages (Greek, Italian, Turkish, Mandarin, Chinese and Macedonian) and may be available for translation purposes. Please note, however, that we cannot guarantee the availability of a translator. Where possible, patients are asked to bring someone who can translate for them.

Vision Eye Institute Coburg ophthalmologists have significant experience and interest in treating a range of conditions that affect the eye. Some of the main services that our eye specialists provide are listed below.

Cataract surgery

Cataract surgery is one of the most common procedures performed in the world and can restore your vision and quality of life. Cataracts form when the normally transparent lens in your eye becomes cloudy. Surgery to remove and replace the lens with an artificial one is the only way to treat a cataract. With the development of new intraocular lenses, some patients may not require reading glasses after their cataract procedure. Our cataract surgeons are highly experienced and can help you choose the right lens for your vision and lifestyle needs.

Corneal conditions

Vision Eye Institute Coburg is one of the main eye clinics in Melbourne that performs corneal cross-linking for patients with keratoconus. This procedure may be recommended by your doctor to help stop the condition from progressing and your eye sight from deteriorating further. Corneal collagen-cross-linking is now available on the Medicare Benefits Scheme, meaning patients can access a rebate.

Our doctors also treat other corneal conditions such as corneal abrasions and ulcers, keratitis, Fuchs’ dystrophy, pterygium (Surfer’s Eye) and ocular herpes.

Retinal conditions

We treat the full range of retinal conditions, including macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal tears, macular holes and eye floaters.

Pupil-dilating drops are often used to allow a thorough examination of the retina, which is the light-sensitive tissue lining the back of the eye. These drops make your vision blurry and increase sensitivity to glare and light. Please bring a pair of sunglasses with you to the consultation and be aware that you may need to wait until your vision has returned to normal before you can drive home. Alternatively, you may wish to make other travel arrangements.

Please be aware that some retinal conditions require urgent treatment, perhaps even on the day of your consultation.

Vision Eye Institute Coburg patients with macular conditions are able to access a support program called Smart Sight. Please ask your doctor or orthoptist for further information.

Glaucoma

Also known as the ‘sneak thief of sight’, glaucoma is often undetected until it has reached the advanced stages and there is significant and irreversible vision loss. Unfortunately, there is no cure for glaucoma. Our doctors have expertise in diagnosing and managing this chronic condition using medications, laser therapy, minimally invasive surgery (e.g. iStent) and trabeculectomy.

Laser eye surgery

Most people with short-sightedness, long-sightedness and astigmatism are eligible for some form of vision correction procedure. Our surgeons have expertise in laser eye surgery (LASIK, ASLA/PRK), refractive lens exchange and implantable lenses.

At your initial assessment, we will carefully examine your eyes to determine whether you are suitable for vision correction. At the same time, we can also recommend the procedure that is most appropriate for you. Like any surgery, there are benefits and risks and your surgeons will discuss these with you in detail.

The following services are available at our clinic:

  • Free, no obligation laser surgery assessments performed by our Clinical Optometrist, Kyra Stretton. Find out if you are eligible for laser eye surgery.
  • Pre-surgical consultations with one of our highly experienced laser eye surgeons or Clinical Optometrist Kyra Stretton. Have your full assessment before surgery, discuss the most suitable surgical option for you (LASIK or PRK) and get all your questions answered.
  • Post-operative care supported by Kyra Stretton, in conjunction with our laser doctors.

Laser eye surgery will be performed at our dedicated, state-of-the-art laser suite at our Melbourne (St Kilda Rd) clinic.

Payment plans

Vision Eye Institute patients can access a plan to suit their needs through one of the following options.*

  • LatitudePay for services up to $1,000 – Interest Free, ten weekly payments, no account fees, fast approval
  • LatitudePay+ for services up to $10,000 – Interest Free, flexible repayment period (6, 12, 18 or 24 months), low monthly account fee, fast approval

*Approved customers only. Full T&Cs apply. Payment plan provided by LatitudePay Australia Pty Ltd ABN 23 633 538 873. Before applying for any form of credit, always read the full terms and conditions.

The Zigging Queen // Jewish.Ru — Global Jewish Online Center

Photographs have been published in the UK in which the future Queen Elizabeth II and her mother held out their hands in a Nazi salute. The man in the frame - the future King Edward VIII - teaches Elizabeth's younger sister to zigzag. The photographs caused a huge wave of discussion and discontent and again raised the question of the sympathies of the ruling royal house in Great Britain for Nazi Germany.

The photo is actually just a frame from a short, 17-second amateur documentary. It was filmed, apparently, in the summer of 1933 years old during a royal family holiday at Balmoral Castle in Scotland. According to the Times, Elizabeth's father, the future King George VI, acted as a cameraman. In this case, the film was to be kept with all other footage of the august family at the British Film Institute, and the rights to it belong to the Queen and her heirs. The Institute has already launched an investigation to determine whether its employees were involved in the leak of sensational film footage.

According to another version, a copy of the film could have been kept in Paris, at the villa of Edward VIII's American widow Wallis Simpson. For the sake of marriage with her, the English king abdicated ten months after the coronation. After Simpson's death at 19In 86, the villa, along with all things, was acquired by the entrepreneur Mohammed al-Fayed. Later, he sold the property located there at auctions. Sun chose not to disclose how the footage came to them, saying only that it happened "by legal means."

Buckingham Palace, of course, condemned the publication of the film and began its own investigation into how it got into the media. “It is regrettable that this film, made 80 years ago and apparently belonging to Her Majesty’s personal family archive, was received and used in this form,” a spokesman for the monarch said. And a source close to the royal family told The Times yesterday that Buckingham Palace is looking into the situation from a copyright standpoint and whether there is a criminal component to copyright infringement.

No wonder that Buckingham Palace is trying to shift public attention to the discussion of legal subtleties, thus blurring the main issue - the sympathy of several British monarchs at once, including the current Queen Elizabeth II, for Nazi Germany.

Historians have repeatedly raised the issue of the British royal family's ties to the Third Reich. In her monograph, the German historian Karina Urbach describes in detail how Hitler and the top of the Reich used the British aristocracy for their own purposes. Urbach paid special attention to the history of King Edward VIII and Duke Charles Edward of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. Urbach quotes a telegram sent from the Reich Chancellery shortly before Hitler's suicide, on April 1945 years old, and intercepted by British intelligence: "The Führer believes that Duke Karl-Edward of Coburg should under no circumstances fall into the hands of the enemy." And he draws his own conclusions that in such a veiled form, Hitler ordered to deal with the duke, who, apparently, knew too much. But they did not have time to fulfill the order, and Karl-Eduard died a natural death in 1954.

He was born in England and was the grandson of Queen Victoria. However, at the age of 16, he ascended the throne of the monarch in the German duchy of Saxe-Coburg, losing his title only during the revolution of 1918 years old. But even after the revolution, the duke retained a significant personal fortune. In 1935, Karl-Eduard joined the Nazi Party and the SA, receiving the title of Gruppenfuehrer of this organization. He would later be called "Hitler's favorite prince". Karl-Eduard was a staunch anti-Semite. At the end of the war, he stated that Hitler's methods may have been excessively harsh, but they were necessary to eliminate Jewish influence from German science, culture and the press. Probably, it was under the influence of his relative Charles Edward that the future British king Edward VIII was imbued with sympathy for nationalist ideas.

“King Edward was attracted to the social ideas of the Nazis,” writes Urbach. – In addition, in principle, many representatives of the British aristocracy perceived the Nazis as their potential defenders from the “red plague”. Therefore, they did not see a problem in anti-Semitism either: Jews seemed to them potential Marxist revolutionaries, and therefore a threat to their existence. The informal network of like-minded people created by the Duke of Coburg in Britain was extremely useful for the Nazi elite. In the mid-1930s, Hitler sought an alliance with Britain, he needed a man with connections in the English establishment. Charles Edward was perfect for this role, as he maintained close ties with his British relatives, especially with Edward VIII and Queen Mary (mother of Edward VIII and George VI, grandmother of Elizabeth II), also pro-German. Maria had a correspondence with Charles Edward, which mysteriously disappeared after the war, and the British royal archive really does not give access to Mary's personal archive.

“The British royal family regularly posts photos of newborn princes and princesses in an attempt to generate sentimental adoration,” Urbach stresses. “When it comes to important historical documents that can reveal many of the mysteries of the 20th century, the royal archivists begin to play silent.” Karina Urbach is sure that for only one reason - if these documents are published, the British royal family will appear as convinced Nazis and anti-Semites. How does she appear as such after the appearance in the Sun of a photograph with zigging monarchs.


100th Anniversary of Windsor

July 17, 1917 the "rebranding" of the ruling house of Great Britain took place - the Saxe-Coburg-Goth dynasty changed its name and became known as Windsor

From wise monarchs to reckless heirs, from world domination to the collapse of the empire, from crises and wars to prosperity and economic growth - over the 100 years of rule, the Windsor dynasty has gone through ups and downs, preserving not only the very institution of the monarchy, but also its country. TASS tells how three kings and one queen made the UK what it is today.

Detail from John Speed's Berkshire map showing Windsor Palace. The illustration dates from around 1570

The first of the dynasty

The future King George V with his mother - Queen Alexandra (sister of Maria Feodorovna - wife of the Russian Emperor Alexander III and mother of the last Russian Emperor Nicholas II). 1865

The history of the Windsor originates from the legendary Queen Victoria. Her son Edward VII is the first representative of the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha dynasty, which would later become Windsor. Edward VII ascended the throne in 1901, at the age of 59, and became famous as one of the brightest statesmen of that time, an outstanding orator and diplomat. He was called the "Uncle of Europe" (he was the uncle of several European monarchs), and the "Peacemaker" (he managed to establish relations with England's old enemy - France). Edward VII died at 1910, passing the throne to his son George - the first of the Windsors.

The surname of the dynasty was changed due to anti-German sentiments during the First World War - in the midst of the conflict, the British smashed Bavarian butcher shops and even stoned German dachshunds. Historians believe that one of the reasons for the rebranding of the dynasty was the bombing of London by the German Gotha G.IV aircraft - the very name of the aircraft was reminiscent of the surname worn by the king, and it was humiliating.

On July 17, 1917, George V issued a proclamation to rid the ruling dynasty of its former name. The name "Windsor" refers to Windsor Castle - one of the main residences of the British monarch. The descendants of Queen Victoria and her husband Prince Albert in the male line, who are British subjects, were declared members of the House of Windsor, with the exception of women who had already married members of other families.

Coronation of George V in Westminster Abbey. London, 22 June 1911 years old

In addition to changing the name of the dynasty, the king renounced all personal and family Germanic titles. The monarch took the war with Germany extremely seriously - he wore only khaki clothes, introduced a Spartan regime in the royal court, worked tirelessly with the military and visited hospitals with wounded soldiers.

Tsarevich Nicholas and Duke of York George, 1892

Don't be surprised if George V reminds you of the last Russian Tsar Nicholas II - they were maternal cousins. Another cousin of the monarch - Wilhelm II - the last emperor of Germany. The Kaiser abdicated at 1918, when the November Revolution began in Berlin and other German cities, and subsequently fled to the Netherlands. Nicholas II, who also left the throne during the February Revolution, could have received political asylum in Great Britain, but at the decisive moment George V opposed this. According to him, the arrival of the disgraced emperor would have a negative impact on the state of affairs in the country - the king did not want a repetition of the events of the Russian revolution in Great Britain. According to recently declassified documents, British intelligence still planned to rescue the tsar from Bolshevik captivity in the spring of 1918 years, but this plan was never destined to come true.

The overthrow of the relatives was an important lesson for Georg - he came to the conclusion that in order to prevent revolutions, the monarchy must be more democratic and close to the people and the working class. Therefore, the king maintained good relations with moderate politicians from the Labor Party, communicated with representatives of trade unions and actively participated in all domestic political affairs. During the miners' strike and the general strike of 1926, George V used every opportunity to reconcile the parties. He personally addressed the then Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin with a request not to use force against the protesters. To the premier's objections that "revolutionaries" allegedly took to the streets, the king replied: "Try to live on their salary before condemning them."

King George V and his wife Queen Mary with their sons Prince Edward and Prince Albert. London 3 July 1930

George V finally secured his status as a "people's" monarch in 1932, when for the first time in Great Britain he delivered a Christmas radio address, the text of which was written by Rudyard Kipling. The king initially did not like this idea, but he changed his mind when he was convinced that "this is what the people want." The novelty was really liked and became a tradition. Three years later, during the celebration of the 25th anniversary of the ascension to the throne, George V admitted that he did not expect such people's love: "I can't understand this ... After all, I'm just a pretty ordinary guy."

Prince Charming

Prince Edward during his visit to the USA. October 1924

Meanwhile, relations within the royal family were not cloudless - because of hostility between the king and the heir. The throne was to go to the eldest son of the monarch - Edward - a young and popular member of the House of Windsor, whom the British jokingly called the "handsome prince" (Prince Charming) - for his beauty, spontaneity and other virtues. His visit to New York at 1924 was covered in the press as the most sensational event of the year - it was invariably followed by crowds of reporters and fans who tried to win the favor of the main bachelor on the planet. Any news of Edward's visit immediately made it to the front page of the newspapers, so articles came out under such ridiculous headlines as "The heir to the throne laughed at a joke" and "The prince ran away from the girls on the polo field."

Such crazy fame, royal duties, etiquette and lifestyle were disgusting to Edward. In a letter addressed to one of his mistresses, the prince wrote that he was infuriated by "camouflaged smiles and so-called affability. " "Perhaps I will become the same as my damn dad, or even worse if I lose you," the young man lamented. His passion then was Frida Dudley Ward - the wife of a deputy, known in British secular circles. In general, the prince twisted more than one novel, apparently inheriting the passionate disposition of his grandfather Edward VII.

King George V, Queen Mary and their granddaughter Elizabeth greet the crowd from the balcony of Buckingham Palace. London, 6 May 1935

George V knew about his son's addictions and disliked him for his behavior unworthy of a monarch. But he doted on his youngest son Albert and granddaughter Elizabeth (Georg affectionately called his granddaughter Lilibet, and she called him "Grandfather England"). The king secretly hoped that it was the two of them who would pass the throne: "I pray to God that my eldest son will never marry, and nothing will come between Bertie (Prince Albert - Note TASS ), Lilibet and the throne. " He spoke differently about the heir: "When I die, this boy will destroy himself in 12 months."

Prince Edward and his beloved Wallis Simpson. June 3, 1938

The words of the king became almost prophetic: after the death of George V, his son Edward VIII ruled the country for only 10 months (from January 20 to December 11, 1936) and was not even crowned. He abdicated to marry twice-divorced American Wallis Simpson. The British government could not give consent to the union, because such a marriage is unacceptable for the monarch and, moreover, the head of the Anglican Church. Edward VIII voluntarily signed the abdication law and on the night of December 11, 19At the age of 36, he spoke on the radio with a speech: "I found it impossible to bear the heavy burden of responsibility and fulfill the duties of the king without the help and support of the woman I love." Prince Albert, next in line of succession, automatically became King of Great Britain (he was later crowned George VI), and his daughter Elizabeth became heir to the throne.

The king speaks

Like his father, George VI was the youngest of the direct heirs to the throne, and therefore was not prepared to lead the country. Bertie was a decent family man, a modest and shy person, and he also suffered from a severe stutter. He had a military background and a brief career in the air and navy, but he never thought he would have to run an empire at war. George VI intended to prevent conflict and personally address Adolf Hitler with a "pacifying" message, but he invariably ran into resistance from the then Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain. At 19In 38, he signed the Munich Agreement with Hitler, Mussolini and Daladier and, returning to London, proclaimed to the public "I have brought you peace!" As early as next year, it became clear that the policy of appeasement did not bring results - the Second World War began.

King George VI addresses the British by radio after the start of World War II. London, September 3, 1939

In the eyes of the British, the royal family has become an example of perseverance and self-sacrifice. Despite regular air raids, George VI and his family hardly left Buckingham Palace, although they often spent the night at Windsor Castle. They also restricted themselves from eating and using running water. During the "London Blitz", from which the East End area suffered the most, two bombs exploded right on the lawn of the royal residence. Queen Elizabeth (not the daughter, but the wife of George VI) then said: "I'm glad that we were bombed. Now I feel that we can look the East End in the eye."

German bomber Dornier 217 in the sky over London

Throughout the war, George VI and his wife visited military units, factories and hospitals to boost British morale. The king regularly practiced shooting with different types of weapons, and every Tuesday he met at lunch with the new prime minister, Winston Churchill, to discuss the state of affairs in a relaxed atmosphere. Historians call their union "the closest personal relationship between a monarch and a prime minister in modern British history", although at first George believed that Churchill was not suitable for the post of prime minister.

King George VI (second from right) and Queen Elizabeth during a visit to one of the military units. July 31, 1941

In parallel, the king continued to work on his stuttering and, under the guidance of a self-taught Australian speech therapist, Lionel Logue, almost completely got rid of the disease. In 1939, he gave a nine-minute Christmas speech on the radio, which was of tremendous importance for the rallying of the British. About this, 70 years later, the film "The King's Speech!" - an Oscar-winning, but rather inaccurate, from a historical point of view, drama. One of the director's "fictions" is the enthusiastic crowds that meet the king at Buckingham Palace after his speech. Nothing like at 19The 39th did not happen. But on May 8, 1945, on European Victory Day, thousands of Britons did indeed gather at the royal residence and shout laudatory slogans such as "We want the king" (We want the king). To the delight of the crowd, the monarch and the rest of the royal family appeared on the balcony of Buckingham Palace, accompanied by Churchill.

Princess Elizabeth, Queen Elizabeth, Winston Churchill, George VI and Princess Margaret on VE Day. 8 May 1945 years old

The post-war reign of George was marked by the collapse of the British Empire and its transformation into the Commonwealth of Nations. The foundation for this process was laid during his father's time - in 1931, the Statute of Westminster was adopted, which secured the de facto independence of the British dominions in all matters except foreign policy. Until 1947, all dominions, colonies and protectorates were formally subordinate to the British monarch, but after the transformation of the empire into the Commonwealth of Nations, his role became symbolic (in 17 states of the Commonwealth, the British monarch is still the de jure head of state).

King George VI, Princess Elizabeth, Prince Philip, Princess Margaret and Queen Elizabeth look at young Prince Charles sitting on a sculpture of a deer. Balmoral Castle, August 1951

The stress of the war had a detrimental effect on the health of George VI, who also smoked a lot (he had one lung removed in September 1951). In January of the following year, he found the strength to take his daughter on vacation to Kenya and at the airport asked her former nanny: "For my sake, look after Lilibet!" A week later, on February 6, George VI died in his sleep from a coronary thrombosis. Lilibet returned from Kenya as Queen Elizabeth II.

Record Queen

Princess Elizabeth changes car tires at the officers' training center. April 18, 1945

The oldest among the current monarchs, the longest-reigning head of state in world history, the record holder for the longest time on the British throne - it seems that modern Britain is no longer imaginable without the "grandmother" Elizabeth II. But at 1952, when her father George VI died, Lilibet was only 25 years old. The future queen began to take an active part in the affairs of the country even earlier - at the age of 18 she became one of the five "state advisers" (that is, persons entitled to perform the functions of the king in the event of his absence or incapacity). In 1945, the heiress joined the women's self-defense squad and became an ambulance driver, ending her service with the rank of lieutenant. After the war, she spoke on the radio, accompanied her parents on trips, and also married 26-year-old Philip Mountbatten, a British Navy officer, a member of the Greek and Danish royal families and great-great-grandson of Queen Victoria. George VI reluctantly agreed to the marriage, considering it not a very successful match.

In the face of the princess, the British saw a new, young England, and many, without exaggeration, were crazy about her. "When we were kids, she was sweet. We were about 11, she was 21 years old, and she looked great. And what a figure she had ... I shouldn't say that about Her Majesty, but in school years we said:" Check it out What forms she has!", - recalled a member of The Beatles Paul McCartney. No less than Elizabeth II was adored by the press and only rising television. .

Queen Elizabeth II returns to Buckingham Palace after her coronation ceremony. June 2, 1953

From the point of view of traditional genealogy, in which kinship is determined through the male line, the Windsor dynasty should have ended with Elizabeth II. Prince Charles and his descendants would have to belong to the Glücksburg branch of the House of Oldenburg, from which the husband of Elizabeth II Prince Philip comes (the Russian Emperor Peter III and all his descendants in the male line also belonged to this house).

Queen Elizabeth II and her husband Prince Philip during a visit to Canada, June 18, 1959

However, in 1952, the Queen issued a proclamation that her descendants, although not descendants of Victoria and Albert in the male line, would continue to belong to the House of Windsor. So the future king, Prince Charles, his son William and grandson George - the direct heirs to the throne - will retain their former surname.

History could have turned out differently. According to royal family biographers, Prince Philip insisted that the Queen take his surname Mountbatten and was furious when Elizabeth, on the advice of Churchill, retained the title of Windsor. “I am the only man in the country who cannot pass on his last name to children. I am nothing but a damn amoeba,” Prince Philip lamented in conversations with friends. Elizabeth II sincerely loved her husband, his outbursts of anger brought her to tears. As a compromise, it was proposed that all subsequent descendants of Elizabeth and Philip, with the exception of princes and princesses, would bear the double surname of Windsor-Mountbatten. True, the rule turned out to be not "iron" - the royal daughter, Princess Anna, during marriage at 19In 73, she signed with a double surname.

During the years of Elizabeth's reign, tectonic shifts occurred both in Great Britain itself and in the surrounding world. Some of the former colonies of the United Kingdom (India, Australia, Canada and others) have themselves become strong international players. Meanwhile, the country was going through hard times - in the 1970s, the kingdom's economy experienced serious difficulties, and the royal family almost found itself on the verge of bankruptcy.

Queen Elizabeth II shakes hands with future British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. September 4, 1975

In 1979 Britain received its first female prime minister, Margaret Thatcher, who, in keeping with the George VI tradition, spoke to the Queen every Tuesday about state affairs. The women often disagreed with each other - the Queen was opposed to the economic policies of Thatcherism, but always kept herself above political fights and never publicly expressed her political likes or dislikes. The same applied to the numerous palace intrigues that unfolded in the Windsor family in 1980s and 1990s.

This detachment had a downside - in 1997, after the death of Princess Diana, the queen's long silence was criticized by the public and the press as disrespectful to her former daughter-in-law. "Show you care, ma'am," the Express wrote scathingly. It was one of the most difficult periods for the Windsors - according to opinion polls, every fourth inhabitant of the country supported the abolition of the monarchy. Five years earlier, Elizabeth II had endured what she herself called annus horribilis, "a terrible year." At 19In 1992, two of the Queen's four children, Prince Andrew and Princess Anne, divorced their spouses, Prince Charles separated from Princess Diana, and Windsor Castle suffered a massive fire. In addition, for the first time in history, the queen was made responsible for paying income tax, and the funding of the royal court was noticeably reduced.

Windsor Castle during the fire. November 21, 1992

At the turn of the century, The Economist called the British monarchy "an ideal whose time has passed.


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